NC Comicon 2016 and ComiQuest Film Festival

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The ComiQuest Film Festival for Dangerous Humans is all about logical analogies: connecting the YOUNG ANIMAL series of comic books to their spiritual counterparts in the world of film. Like pairing the right wine with a great meal, these films have been hand-picked to underscore the scope, flavor, and thematic elements of each comic and project them onto the big screen.

The festival features selections by YOUNG ANIMAL creators Gerard Way, Tommy Lee Edwards, Nick Derrington, Jody Houser, Jon Rivera, and Marley Zarcone and includes an array of modern classics and old favorites that are sure you to whet your appetite for everything YOUNG ANIMAL has to offer.

DOOM PATROL
THE ADVENTURES OF BUCKAROO BANZAI ACROSS THE 8TH DIMENSION
(PG, 1984, 103 min)
Brilliant brain surgeon Banzai (Peter Weller) just made scientific history. Shifting his Oscillation Overthruster into warp speed, he’s the first man ever to travel to the Eighth Dimension and come back sane! But when the demented Dr. Lizardo (John Lithgow) devises a plot to steal the Overthruster, Buckaroo goes cranium to cranium with the madman in an extra-dimensional battle that could result in total annihilation of the universe!

John Carpenter’s BIG TROUBLE IN LITTLE CHINA
(PG-13, 1986, 100 min)
Kurt Russell is Jack Burton, a tough-talking, wisecracking truck driver whose life takes a sudden tailspin when his best friend’s fiancée is kidnapped. Speeding to the rescue, Jack finds himself deep beneath San Francisco’s Chinatown, in a creature-filled world ruled by Lo Pan, a 2000-year-old magician who presides over an empire of spirits. Dodging demons and facing baffling terrors, Jack battles his way through Lo Pan’s domain in a full-throttled ride to rescue the girl.

CAVE CARSON
Steven Spielberg’s THE ADVENTURES OF TINTIN
(PG, 107 min, 2011)
The Adventures of Tintin follows the exciting exploits of a young reporter, his dog, a sea captain with a drinking problem, and a couple of bumbling Interpol detectives as they travel from Europe to the Sahara and Morocco in pursuit of a pickpocket, model-ship collectors, and long-lost treasure.

Edgar Rice Burrough’s AT THE EARTH’S CORE
(PG, 89 min, 1976)
Murderous monsters, scantily clad prehistoric playmates and telepathic pterodactyls inhabit the center of our world in this colorful fantasy-adventure about a manned “drill-craft” boring its way to the center of the Earth! Starring sci-fi superstars Doug McClure, Peter Cushing, and Caroline Munro, this subterranean chiller is the most endearingly whimsical entertainment on—or under—the planet’s surface!

SHADE THE CHANGING GIRL
MEAN GIRLS
(PG-13, 96 min, 2004)
Raised in the African bush country by her zoologist parents, Cady Heron (Lindsay Lohan) thinks she knows about “survival of the fittest.” But the law of the jungle takes on a whole new meaning when the home-schooled 15-year-old enters public high school for the first time and falls prey to the psychological warfare and unwritten social rules that teenage girls face today.

John Carpenter’s THEY LIVE
(R, 1987, 93 min)
Horror master John Carpenter (Halloween, The Thing) directs this heart-pounding thriller. Aliens are systematically gaining control of the Earth by masquerading as humans and lulling the public into submission. Humanity’s last chance lies with a lone drifter who stumbles upon a harrowing discovery : a unique pair of sunglasses that reveals the terrifying and deadly truth. But worst of all, with these glasses you see which of us are really hideous, bug-eyed aliens.

MOTHER PANIC
Stanley Kubrick’s A CLOCKWORK ORANGE
(UK, R, 137 min, 1971)
Malcolm McDowell stars as Alex, the leader of a quartet of droogs, a vicious group of young hoodlums who spend their nights stealing cars, fighting rival gangs, and raping women. We watch Alex transform from a miscreant into a convict used in a government experiment that attempts to reform criminals. But is the therapy nothing more than a quick cure-all for a society plagued by rampant crime?

Brian De Palma’s THE PHANTOM OF THE PARADISE
(PG, 1974, 92 min)
After hearing Winslow Leach (William Finley) perform a song from his Faust rock opera, Swan (Paul Williams) steals the music and has Winslow imprisoned but not before Winslow meets aspiring songbird Phoenix (Jessica Harper). After an accident grossly disfigures him, Winslow disguises himself as the Phantom. Determined to have Phoenix sing, the Phantom discovers just how far Swan will go to give the people what they want?

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Times and Showings

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